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TECO 2030 AND AVL COMPLETE CARBON CAPTURE FEASIBILITY STUDY

TECO 2030 AND AVL COMPLETE CARBON CAPTURE FEASIBILITY STUDY

Thursday, May 6, 2021 

The shipping industry can reduce CO2 emission dramatically by installing onboard Carbon Capture and Storage equipment, according to a feasibility study jointly conducted between TECO 2030 and AVL, which has concluded that onboard Carbon Capture and Storage is technically and financially viable.

The next phase of the project will be a pilot development and test for maritime applications, focusing on verification and optimisation of the technologies.

According to the Paris Agreement global greenhouse gas emissions need to be cut in half to stay below the  global warming limit of 2 deg C. If left unregulated, international maritime transport is expected to be responsible for 17% of global greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 according to Cames et al (2015). Although shipping is by far the most carbon efficient mode of commercial transport, greenhouse gas emissions from shipping are estimated to be about 3% of total global emissions today and predicted to increase rapidly towards 2050, if no actions are taken.

As an example, a average capesize ship with a yearly consumption of about 15.000t of fuel, will emit about 45.000t of CO2. These CO2 emissions can be reduced by 30%-40% with TECO CCS technology onboard and have a large impact on the ship’s Energy Efficiency Index (EEXI) and Carbon Intensity Index (CII).

“The carbon capture and storage is very attractive for shipowners who seek to future proof their vessels to meet decarbonization plans and strategies. According to Clarksons Research Portal, the CCS technology will be beneficial to over 80.000 vessels globally, and the CO2 emission reduction possibilities onboard are endless,” said Tore Enger, CEO of TECO 2030.

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